12K L.A. River storm drains to be retrofitted

To demonstrate how the storm drains work, officials in Long Beach simulated what happens when it rains. The retractable screen opens, water and trash go in, but a second screen inside the drain captures the debris. Crews will vacuum it out periodically.

 

 

12K L.A. River storm drains to be retrofitted

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

 

 

12K L.A. River storm drains to be retrofitted | abc7.com    By Melissa MacBride

LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) — The lower Los Angeles River is on its way to becoming a cleaner body of water with the help of a system of screens that lets water in and keeps garbage out.

The project will improve 12,000 storm drain catch basins in cities along the river.

“There is an enormous amount of work to bring this river system back to where it really ought to be so that we can all enjoy clean water, free of debris, free of bacteria,” said Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster.

To demonstrate how the storm drains work, officials in Long Beach simulated what happens when it rains. The retractable screen opens, water and trash go in, but a second screen inside the drain captures the debris. Crews will vacuum it out periodically. It’s paid for with $10 million in federal stimulus money.

“It’s very costly to remove trash from the storm drains and even more costly to remove it from our beaches,” said Mark Christoffels, an engineer for the city of Long Beach. “I think the tax payers are going to see a significant return on their $10 million investment here.”

“They’re putting that to good use and as long as it’s environmentally safe, and safe for the fishes and animals and children, I think it’s a good thing,” said Long Beach resident Ronald Allen.

The catch basins will keep out an estimated 840,000 pounds of trash per year, trash that flows out into the L.A. River and eventually into the ocean.

Some Long Beach residents said they look forward to reaping the benefits of cleaner beaches.

“I think it’s good,” said Juliet Ojeda of Long Beach. “It’s about time. We can stop the pollution and it helps the environment for the ocean.”

After Long Beach, the storm drains in Vernon leading to the river will be upgraded and by next June all 12,000 will be in place.

(Copyright ©2010 KABC-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)

abc7.com

 

 

Upstream Cities Get Pollution-Preventing Stormdrain Screens

by Ryan ZumMallen | Long Beach News | 08.05.10 |

 

Water, along with plastic bags and other trash, rushes head-on into a metal stormdrain gate that will soon be installed in 16 cities upstream along the Los Angeles River.

Water, along with plastic bags and other trash, rushes head-on into a metal stormdrain gate that will soon be installed in 16 cities upstream along the Los Angeles River.

 

1:20pm | About 12,000 metal gates will be installed at the opening of stormdrains in sixteen cities that empty into the Los Angeles River, as a measure to reduce pollution that accumulates in the river and ultimately, the Pacific Ocean and the coast of Long Beach.

For as long as modern plumbing has been around, cities that are upstream of the Los Angeles River have emptied their stormdrains into the channel and sent it out to the ocean. This has been a main culprit in Long Beach’s notoriously dirty shoreline and the installation of stormdrain gates should prevent p to 840,000 pounds of trash from entering the system each year.

 

LBPOST.com: Upstream Cities Get Pollution-Preventing Stormdrain Screens

 

The gate is a simple metal design that catches trash and debris before it enters the sewers. In a demonstration, fast food cups and potato chip bags were stopped even as the gates opened to allow rushing water into the sewer. If debris does happen to enter the system, basins inside the drain will catch and filter it out. The leftover pollution is extracted by the city or collected through street sweeping. It is exactly the kind of system that has been in place in Long Beach for several years, and was profiled in an LBPOST.com article last summer.

But finally, those same practices are reaching the more than one dozen cities that also contribute to Long Beach’s horrendous water quality. In years past, many have sought to hold upstream cities responsible for their roles in the pollution, and there was even a failed effort to pursue litigation. Last year, city officials estimated that trash and debris from the city of Long Beach accounts for just 3% of the city’s ocean pollution.

 

LBPOST.com: Upstream Cities Get Pollution-Preventing Stormdrain Screens

 

With $10 million available from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Los Angeles Gateway Authority will oversee the construction and installation of the metal gates. The actual work will be performed by a local contracting business. Cities from Compton and Paramount to Maywood and Montebello will have the gates installed.

LBPOST.com



Leave a Reply